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Der Einfluss von Gender-Stereotypen auf unterrichtliches Handeln von Lehrkräften


Despite considerable progress in women's participation in STEM fields in the last decades (Burrelli, 2008; Destatis, 2013) women are still less likely than men to enter and pursue a career in this area. Possible causes for the underrepresentation of women in science and especially in math-intensive STEM fields despite their relatively similar performance were suggested to be related to factors such as biological differences the lack of fit between math and self-concept (Hannover & Kessels, 2004), and differences in occupational or lifestyle preferences and choices (Ceci & Williams, 2011). In particular, the influence of so called gatekeepers or agents of socialization like parents, teachers, peers or society in general has been the subject of research for many years. A large body of work has shown that parents' and teachers' gender stereotypes influence children's self-perceptions, motivation and achievement in math (Eccles & Jacobs, 1986; Eccles, Jacobs, & Harold, 1990; Jacobs, 1991; Jacobs & Eccles, 1992; Yee & Eccles, 1988). While previous research has mainly examined the relationship between gender stereotypes and teachers' instructional practices and interactions during class, the present study addresses another potential area of teachers' influence, namely, tracking recommendations for secondary schools. We investigated the extent to which differences in implicit and explicit math-language gender stereotypes, and essentialist beliefs among student teachers affect tracking recommendations for math/science versus language oriented secondary schools by using male and female versions of vignettes. Consistent with expectations, our results suggest that student's gender influences student teachers' school career recommendations: boys are more likely recommended a math/science oriented school whereas girls are more likely recommended a language oriented school. Implicit math-language gender stereotypes proved to uniquely contribute to stereotypicality of school career recommendations to an extent that explicit measures did not. Moreover, the more student teachers attribute behavior or personal characteristics to a biological basis the more stereotypical are their tracking recommendations. The results suggest that identifying and more closely investigating factors contributing to stereotypical behavior in teachers might help to minimize biased actions and decisions in class.

Poster Teilprojekt B3

Betreuung:
Prof. Dr. Josef Nerb
Prof. Dr. Josef Nerb

Prof. Dr. Hans Spada
Prof. Dr. Hans Spada

Doktorandin:
Mirjam Nürnberger
Mirjam Nürnberger